May 05 2012

Writing about the Divine Feminine caused me to think of a special person I knew in upstate New York.

She was a dancer, a writer a teacher and mentor. She was a very unusual woman. She was spiritual and, at times, didn’t seem of this world. And yet her basic information on her FaceBook page was down to earth while stating:

‘these are the good old days’

I’m a liberal Dem, but not politically correct.

Interested in the art of ‘hangoutology’ and good conversation.
Dancing, writing, painting, performing and cooking are what I love doing best

Her Relationship Status sounds just like her when it says, “It’s complicated”

Her given name was Elaine Zessi, but “Zoe Artemis” was the name she commonly used.

Zoe Artemis, professional name of Elaine Zessi

If there is one thing I love to do, it’s network. Introduce people and cause paths to cross that would never have happened otherwise. But, then, I love it when acquaintances do the same for me in return. When I owned and operated my quilting business for nine years in the 1980s, I used to give weekend retreats where all of the food was catered and quilters could come and quilt without distraction. One of my quilters, Kathy from Syracuse, introduced me to a Women who had dancing workshops, Zoe Artemis.

Zoe belly-dancing.

The last time I spoke to Zoe, it was about four years ago. She was off on her latest adventures, organizing trips to her land of heritage, Greece. When I went to her web site, it was very pictorial with scenes of Zoe in the Greek islands surrounded by white walls and crystal blue seas and skies. I was enchanted by her new ventures, but not anywhere near attending her trips.

I was also amazed at her social history as she had written essays and placed them on her web site. In our phone call, I HAD to mention her affair with TV’s Ed Bradley of 60 Minutes. “Zoe!” I said, “You never told me you had an affair with Ed Bradley!” I was wide-eyed with celebrity wonderment, thinking I was two degrees from knowing Ed Bradley.

“Oh!” she said. “He was a wonderful man. Very polite and soft spoken. Yes. I liked him very much.”

“But,” she continued, “One doesn’t just talk of such things.”

So, when I decided to write about the Divine Feminine in dance, who would naturally come to mind except Zoe Artemis? Wonderful, other worldly, mentor to hundreds of women, Zoe personified feminine power and grace.

I thought that, wow! I could tie my BlogHer series to Zoe and let all my BlogHer friends know about her workshops and trips to Greece. I thought that while I’ve never been able to go, maybe some of you could!

That’s when I found out the bad news.

Zoe reading in Greece. Look at her beautiful posture!

Searching to find her webs site online, I was led to a new web site, one remembering Zoe! At first, I couldn’t even understand what it meant. “Remembering,” I thought, “That’s what you do for someone who has died.” The meaning just didn’t sink in. It took me several minutes to understand what had happened. It was a reality I was not ready to enter.

But, yes, Zoe died last summer, in 2011, of pancreatic cancer. I have been told she died as she lived, bigger than life with humor and looking ahead to her next tour of Greece. She never verbalized the negative, thinking of her life in the physical coming to an end, but rather, I am told she kept the conversation away from herself, preferring to learn about her visitor. She was always a master at enjoying the moment.

Zoe was an energy healer, using etheric
healing to realign skewed chakras.

Once I began to go to Zoe’s dance workshops, I found out that she also did energy healing and I used to go to her as a healer as well. All of us have a light body of energy that surrounds us, about six inches from our skin outward. If the light body is damaged, it can affect the physical body. Many illnesses can be healed by first healing and aligning the chakras, or energy centers, of the light body.

Zoe traveled in very high powered, intellectual circles. Here
she is reading at a tribute to Jack Kerouac in 2004. She is
at the mic from about 14:49 to 22:30 in the video.

I lost touch with Zoe when I moved away from New York State. It wasn’t until the immediacy of the Internet, I realized I could do a search on her and find her. I immediately found her web site, which is no longer up and running, sent an e-mail and soon, we were on the phone, picking up where we left off years before. Her web site was fascinating and beautiful, just as one would expect.

She talked about her trips to Greece, visiting the site of the Oracle at Delphi and many other tempting images. She encouraged me to come on these wonderful adventures, but, of course, I had too many obligations to take off and “head to the Mediterranean.” In all truth, though, I can’t imagine anything more wonderful than having journeyed as part of Zoe’s tour group. Maybe some day….

And so, now you know that why, whenever I think of the Divine Feminine, I think of Zoe, with all of her spiritual and physical talents and attributes.

And now, you will understand why, when I planned this series of Divine Feminine dancing posts, I just HAD to let you know about the incarnation in our time space known as Elaine Zessi, or Zoe Artemis.

For more information on energy healing:

“Hands of Light: A Guide to Healing
Through the Human Energy Field”

by Barbara Ann Brennan

Zoe’s writer’s trips to Greece are continuing. Look
for my post on “Women Reading Aloud,” coming soon.

Tomorrow: Zoe’s New Feminism

 

NaBloPoMo May 2012

 



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Apr 15 2012

The Titanic hit an iceberg, or so they say, the night of April 14, 1912, just before midnight.

She sank on April 15. It happened a hundred years ago, today.

The Titanic was built at a time of maritime travel command, when ocean travel provided access to other continents.

This postcard was mailed in 1908. It shows the fascination
with large ocean liners for upper class travel. It also shows
that Peeps travel in the best company.

My interest in the RMS Titanic seriously began when I saw the movie, “The Unsinkable Molly Brown,” in 1964. Molly Brown sailed on the Titanic at the last moment, when she learned her grandson was ill and she decided to cut short her holiday in Europe. She was a friend of the John Jacob Astor’s and she decided to go along back with them as they had already booked passage. When the Titanic sank, Molly Brown was famous for demanding her lifeboat, No. 6, go back to the scene and pick up survivors. John Jacob Astor did not survive.

When I moved to Denver, CO in the late 1970s, one of the first things I did was go and see the Molly Brown house where she lived in the heart of downtown Denver. The house was not in good shape and the future did not look good for this Victorian architectural treat. As it turns out, however, the house was saved and is now the Molly Brown House Museum, open to the public in all of its glory.

You can imagine the fuss at the Molly Brown House with this being the Centennial year of the Titanic’s  sinking. There is a Titanic Memorial Cruise in progress, as we speak, and a blogger, Janet Kalstrom is sailing with it, dressed as a Molly Brown persona. You can read her “Chasing Molly” blog, chock full of details and memorabilia, by clicking here.

It seems that history is not always as it seems.

So, I have been interested in the sinking of the Titanic for many years. Many younger people don’t realize that for the better part of my youth, the location of the ship was totally unknown.

When the technology became available to determine its location in 1985, I was spellbound with interest. Eventually, crews with deep water vessels were able to descend far down enough to take photos and send robots wandering through submerged cabins. To me, it was nothing short of miraculous. The coverage in National Geographic was spectacular and I eagerly followed every advance. Today, if you go to the National Geographic web site, there are many Centennial goodies to share.

It is easy with all of the recent technological advances and then, the big screen movie, “Titanic,” from James Cameron, to take viewing the submerged wreck for granted. But, for years, I daydreamed about the wreck, wondering if it would ever be found. I can’t think of another “WOW” movie moment equal to the transition of the opening scenes when the camera pans down the rail of the underwater wreck and then comes alive into the moment where the ship is loading passengers. I get chills just thinking about it.

Another BlogHer blogger, Sarah of “The Best Stuff”, shares her Centennial thoughts and loved the movie as I did.In fact, there are quite a few Titanic posts if one does a BlogHer search.

Another documentary on the possibilities…

But, as fascinating as all of that is, the really intriguing bits are the back story of feuding economic barons, who at the time, owned the world and control much of it. JP Morgan was the owner of the White Star Line, which owned RMS Titanic and John Jacob Astor, was a competitor.

Titanic’s Ghosts Documentary, thinking of those who died.

 

NaBloPoMo April 2012



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Mar 27 2012

Every now and then, little Sunbonnets get the most AMAZING e-mails.

On Wednesday, March 21, I was invited by BlogHer to meet with other BlogHers on Friday, March 23, in the Big Apple.

I have been encouraging BlogHers to get together in real life to enrich our virtual friendships, solidify our communications and bolster mutual support, but I didn’t expect to have to put my money where my mouth was so soon. They called my bluff. They asked was I into it? Or not? I decided I was in. The journey began.

Considering all of the fantastic women involved in BlogHer, though, how could I go wrong? I expected there would be no end to the wonderment and delight. Anyway, when I was invited to go by BlogHer High Command, how could I refuse? I was needed. I was on a mission.

Friday, March 23, was also my 20th wedding anniversary, so I spent a few seconds thinking about whether or not I should go, then it was “Hi-Ho-BlogHer-O, we’ll celebrate when I get back, honey! SEE ya!” as I ran to pack the suitcase.

New York, New York, crossroads of the world.

BlogHer had set the meeting for Friday morning in the Cheslsea district of New York City. Being centrally located for those of us in the mid-Atlantic region of the east coast, it was not a far stretch. And besides, I counted it as a “dry run” for getting up to BlogHer ’12 this summer. One thing to try out for sure was transportation. Before, when I’ve gone to NYC, I’ve flown the commuter flights, but with those TSA checks, I decided to try AmTrak and off I went on the Metro subway to Union Station in Washington, D.C. to catch the AmTrak Acela.

In only two hours and forty five minutes, I was in New York City at Penn Station, standing in the line waiting for a taxi to my hotel. The trip was so effortless, it was hard to believe I was there. With the AmTrak train charging up the east coast at 150 miles/hour, the time and four states just flew by.

Digital Still Life: Arrival at Four Points Sheraton in Chelsea.

When making reservations, it’s sure hard to know what you’re getting into. Even with the Internet and an army of Travelocity Gnomes, one never knows until one arrives just how the accommodations will suit. Well, if I had gathered a committee to pick a great Sunbonnet-friendly site, I couldn’t have done better.

There I was in the garment district, a fair slice of Heaven for a quilter. Shops of fabric, dress manikins and yes, there was even a quilt store and gallery across from the hotel. I was early enough to go shopping and it took a New York minute to select going to the quilt store as a first choice. But, first, I had to walk down the block and get a photo of St. Patrick’s Day balloons bravely flopping in the wind, tangled in a tree, on the Avenue of the Americas. It was SO NEW YORK, I couldn’t resist.

St. Patrick’s Day Balloons at 6th Avenue,
now officially called Avenue of the Americas.

Green foil shamrock balloons, probably left over from the Parade down 5th Avenue on March 17 were tangled in the trees giving testimony to NYC’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade. The New York City Parade is the oldest in the world, having started in 1762, and, as you can tell from their web site, it’s a really BIG deal.

Empty fabric boards in front of The City Quilter
quilt store tell of a prosperous fabric store.

Walking down the other side of the street from the hotel, I stalked my quarry, The City Quilter quilt store and The ArtQuilt Gallery NYC. What a bounty I found inside and what luck they were open until 7:00pm. In fact, I was so impressed by the floor plan, selection of fabrics, shop models and accessories, I have decided to do separate posts on the both shop and gallery.

I have to. It’s the only way to show off all the quilting paraphernalia I was able to enjoy last Thursday evening. Remember, I was a quilt shop business owner myself from 1982-1991, nine years, so I’ve been to a few quilt shops in my career. It is noteworthy, therefore, that I was very impressed by The City Quilter.

On the left, Penn Station and Madison Square Gardens
from the 11th floor of our BlogHer get together.

So, on Friday morning, it was almost time to meet everybody, the three BlogHers who agreed to get together, and I couldn’t have been more excited. After a short workout in the hotel gym, mentioning that for the diet conscious BlogHers with whom I usually comment back and forth as they will be proud of me, I packed my things and got ready to hail a cab to our meeting place.

My heart was beating a mile a minute as I “bag ladied” my stuff to 7th Avenue, hoping people didn’t think I was homeless. I was wondering the whole way as to why my “packing eyes” are always bigger than my “suitcase’s stomach.” The tote bag I bungee corded to the top of my tag along suitcase kept sliding to the side, looking anything but sophisticated. It was Sexless in the City, for sure. I was hoping that none of the BlogHers were watching.

But! I didn’t care. My “wardrobe rig” got me where I wanted to go and I was going to meet other Bloghers, what could be better? And meet other Bloghers I did.

It was so much fun and we had such a good time, that I’m going to have to continue this post to tell you who they were, next time….

NaBloPoMo March 2012



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Mar 17 2012

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

She a bit of a flirt, is this colleen,
With her roguish eyes and bouquet of green.
The sight of this maid so blithe and so gay,
Cheers all Irish hearts on St. Patrick’s Day.

Sunbonnet Smart wishes all those who are Irish,
and all those who will be for today,
a pot of gold and a rainbow under which to find it…

…and an unending flow of blarney
for BlogHer posts!

 

NaBloPoMo March 2012



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Feb 22 2012

Selling cookies and buying calendars while working
on the Child Labor Badge.

What a celebration was Valentine’s Day, 2012. Cupid’s friend arrows were flying, dinner plans were being made and cozy evenings at home were chosen to replace high priced restaurant fare. But, the biggest thing all day for me, this Girl Scout from the 1960s, was earning another badge for my virtual badge sash.

As a Girl Scout, we worked and worked on earning a series of decorative embroidered patches, fulfilling sequential requirements as we went along. Don’t tell anybody, but all my Girl Scouting was many years ago. Habit and training die hard, however, and I still have a Pavlov’s dog response to the mention of a badge to be earned.

So, imagine my delight when a badge award was announced on BlogHer by Laine “Crazy Eyeris” Griffin. I was all over reading that post, like a chicken on a June bug. I couldn’t have been happier when I saw my blog and web site named. The green square of a Versatile Blogger Award, the one I have often gazed upon on Laine’s web site, Laine’s List, was now mine. I patted myself on the back and yelled, “Yippy Ya HOO!” while doing a happy dance.

It turns out, by going to the Versatile Blogger web site, that when one receives the award, one then has to give it away. Laine had received it from MJ Monaghan and was honor bound to re-award the award, carrying it’s influence into ever widening circles.

With award night being Valentine’s Day and so much happening all at once, my attentions were spread thin.  I am just now thanking Laine for the sweet honor of the beautiful spring green, Versatile Blogger Award. I can’t wait to see it on the right hand side of Sunbonnet Smart and I can’t wait until all of BlogHer starts kissing up to me, hoping, praying, that I will choose each of them for my round of Versatile Blogger Award bestowal.

So, get the comments started ladies and Souschef. Wine me. Dine me. Dazzle me and frazzle me with all of your ingratiating appeals. Ring my royal ear and fairy dust my Sparkles. I can’t wait to see you grovel.

BTW, ElaineR.N., don’t worry! You’re in!

And! If you want to make your own badges to inspire, motivate and control your friends, go to this really cool web site that seems to have all the information one needs to set up your own badges!

Alright! Now we don’t HAVE to be nice to people to win one of their badges. We can make our own!

Oh wait…I shouldn’t have included that link….

Too late now….

NaBloPoMo February 2012



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Feb 14 2012

Happy Valentine’s Day

Valentine’s Day is filled with love, but that love isn’t all between lovers. At this time of year, love overflows for all types of people. Maybe the cold of winter makes the warmth of friendship more enticing: we pull each other close like old sweaters, tried and true. For my Sunbonnet Smart followers, many of you know I also blog at BlogHer. Having interacted with bloggers who have become good friends, I have issued forth the following…

Valentine Ode to my BlogHer Followers

Vir-gin-i-a, you were the first,
You taught me what a “friend” was.
Then Julie came and said, “Hello.”
And Darcie’s turn, it next was.

Lainey skated into my heart,
I met “IsThisTheMiddle,”
While Allison’s blue shirt I saw,
and Hypo’s advice I fiddled.

Isabel gave me lofty thoughts,
Next, “LetThemEatGreat,” said, “Hi!”
CookingwithKary came out to play
then Elaine the Nurse, “high five!”

Jane added media class
While Suzie patrolled our BlogHer
And Nancy Wurtzel ruined me for life
with Michelle Bachmann’s corn dogher.

Gina, GILRED, always so sweet,
but watch out for Mood Swings aplenty.
Sabrina’s purple made me smile,
next I met Talking Thirty.

Chivalry Rocks won’t show his face,
With us, can’t say I blame him.
And Thousand Points of Sauce,
is the latest to get her Flame on.

So, there you have the followers of
a baby blue Sunbonnet
and here’s a Valentine for you,
with a little Sunbonnet on it.

Much Love,

Fondly, Robin

NaBloPoMo February 2012



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Jan 29 2012

Depending upon the viewpoint of the recipient, a surprise
party can be a delight or a floodgate of suffocating attention.

Do you like surprise birthday parties? It does put the special person on the spot. I’m not sure that I like them thrown for me, but what fun it is to plan good times for someone else and have everyone in on the secret. I suppose the ends justify the means as only a group of people with the best of intentions would go to all of the trouble of creating such a festive get together.

Just look at the fun a group giving a surprise birthday party can have. Here is an early 1931 cartoon of Mickey and Minnie Mouse with all of their friends springing a surprise birthday party for Mickey and what a party it is. If you grew up in the 1950s like I did watching cartoons on Saturday morning, then you will recognize some of these early Disney characters from when these cartoons, originally played as previews for movies in movie theaters, were shown on TV. Share some old time memories by clicking on the play button below:

Mickey and Minnie thrilled Depression Era children at movie theaters.

Birthdays are such a momentous day of the year for children and when we are children, there are lots of relatives to celebrate each passing year. We know that such rewards and attention will surely be there our whole lives as we bask in the adoration of everyone we know. But, as the years speed by and the glorious attentions of our elders are replaced by photographs and memories, birthday celebrations can thin out quite a bit. Many of us must look forward to planning our own self celebrations, gathering happiness up around our shoulders like a wool shawl on a cool summer evening, thus marking our own yearly passages.

Looking into the sun gives this birthday girl an expression of
entitled impatience while being feted by her twenty two guests.

But, celebrating birthdays together is something we might choose to do for all of our adult friends as we parent each other through the rest of our lives. Making a fuss, sending cards and planning celebratory events increases fellowship and takes each birthday person back to the days when they were a child at birthday parties and there were less then ten candles on the cake. Now, there are even adult birthday party planning sites on the Internet with party supply packages to ease making arrangements.

So, with all the work done, sit up straight, make a wish and blow out all the candles at once!

Sue shows us how to get excited about Surprise Birthday Parties.

If you decide to plan a party, this book has rave reviews. Hover your mouse over the link to preview:

Real Simple: Celebrations



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Jan 18 2012

Visiting “The Future” at the New York World’s Fair, 1964-1965,
while in 1960’s clothes.

When I was a kid, we looked to the future through a TV cartoon time warp called “The Jetsons.” Then, while we watched futuristic “programming” on TV, our parents were also being instructed by mass media that the future would bring better living to us all. We were told daily that the progress to take us blindly into the future would be better, much better than anything in the present. It was inferred that we should just trust whomever was bringing this to pass. And so, when the biggest international event of the decade occurred, the 1964-65 World’s Fair in New York City, we knew we were on the cusp of a wave that would carry us aloft to glorious destinies. We didn’t know where we were heading, but we knew we were getting there fast, and that it was going to be better, right?

Bell Telephone Pavillion: New York World’s Fair 1964-1965.
“Peace through Understanding” Moving chairs carry the Fairgoer
past animated exhibits tracing the history of communications.
Anyone may try out “picture phones” -phones equipped with TV
devices showing the person on the other end.

Bigger was better. Faster was better. More, stronger, cheaper was better. New and improved? Well, of course THAT was better. The words new and improved must mean something was really NEW and IMPROVED. It therefore must be better. The box said so, just as the TV had. Who could argue that the product wasn’t actually new and improved? And since the new and improved product was now and the old has-been product was then, this product in the present HAD to be better…but nothing compared to what it would be in the future!

The New York World’s Fair 1964-1965

And so, whirling in this vortex of progress, spiraling upwards, or so we thought, we became very impressionable to the idea that new was better and old served no purpose. Like modern lemmings, we followed the promises of the TV box that guided us through every day to “improve” our otherwise primitive lives. And so, our societal common sense undermined, we believed like children that modern was good and old fashioned was not only outdated, but bad. For example, I can remember visiting my mother’s family home where her cousin had “modernized” and replaced “all of those silly old, dark, heavy walnut doors and matching woodwork” hoping to bring a Federal Period house into the 20th century.

And here are people in 1965, trying their best to be
“Futuristic” with a lamp pole, sunburst wall clock and
“modern art” man-made fiber curtains.

And as fast was better, convenience overcame tried and true. I can remember my mother laughing, as she opened a loaf of spongy white Wonderbread, that Mrs. So-and-so made bread for her family every week. Nobody we knew had ever made bread. And then we went through all of elementary school, junior and senior high school with the same group of kids year, in and year out. We knew everything about everybody. Trust me, no one baked bread, no one, except Mrs. So-and-so. Buying convenience foods, opening cans, heating up frozen food, using cake mixes: no one we knew had mothers that did anything much more than that. On occasion, cookies might be made from scratch, but NEVER a cake.

Convenience and taste, not nutrition, were the selling points.
H-m-m-m. Wonder what chemicals were used to replicate the eggs?

According to the Joy of Baking:  “Eggs play a major role in cake
baking. Eggs add aeration to the batter, provide structure to
the cake, help bind the ingredients together, keep the cake moist
and add flavor and tenderness.”

Eggs sound important to a cake! What did they use instead?

The modern housewife was told by mass media advertising that convenience was the way of the future and the less done the better. It was the futuristic way to do things for those in the know. The whole concept of eating to nurture the body while promoting wellness was not considered. Nutritional content was not considered. The only things that seemed important were taste and convenience. And if that taste were stimulated by a chemical cocktail, no one seemed to mind or notice.

This hash commercial is odd for a number of reasons. You’ll see
that as long as women were invisible and could open a can of
hash, things were fine.

But, how did the woman and the hash feel about it?
And how nutritious was that dinner of canned hash and eggs?

Little by little, convenience foods became fast foods. It wasn’t that long before men, women and families began eating out more and more. In addition, as people ate out more often, cost became a concern and restaurants offering good “home cooking” were expensive compared to McDonald’s “four course meal with change from a dollar.” We were detached from the concept that what we ate physically became our bodies and minds. In fact, I can’t remember chemical additives or preservatives ever being commonly discussed. Maybe there was mention of nitrates and nitrites in hot dogs once in a while, but overall we ate without self awareness.

Now I understand that nutrient dense food is not only medicine, but provides the foundations for living. That’s why “The Jetson’s” putting a pill in a wall unit that looks prognostic of microwave ovens, closing the door and pushing a button to conveniently produce a plate full of food seems out of date. The concept is old fashioned, from when that was considered “modern” and is comically passe. People now know wholesome, unadulterated slow foodstuffs are truly the building blocks of life. Therefore, any quaint desire for convenience, at the expense of nutrition and wellness, has thankfully gone the way of the TV dinner.

 

Where do great meals begin?

Come to the Table brings you straight to the source of wonderful flavors, beauty, abundance, and pride of place—the small farms of California and the people who tend them season after season.
Alice Waters, the celebrated chef and food activist, introduces a remarkable group of resilient fresh-food artisans who are committed to keeping our food supply delicious, diverse, and safe—for humans and the planet. Meet the folks down on the farm and learn firsthand about the back-to-the-future small-farm economy that’s gaining strength across America. Discover new tastes and memorable traditions. Explore local flavors, wit, and wisdom along with the universal values of a food system that is “good, clean, and fair.” Recreate a range of sumptuous yet simple meals with the farmers’ own family recipes—including breakfast crostata and fresh-fruit jams, stuffed artichokes and black-eyed peas, chile relleno casseroles, pulled pork, and cheesecake.Sustainable food is real food.
Come to the table, and help yourself!
 

If you have an interest in this book, hover your mouse over:

Slow Food Nation’s Come to the Table: The Slow Food Way of Living

NaBloPoMo January 2012



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Jan 01 2012

Sunbonnets the world over are wishing you a bright,
happy, healthy and abundant 2012. 


NaBloPoMo January 2012



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Dec 25 2011

What we do for each other just makes the holidays! Driving all over to find just the right gift. Spending weeks trying recipes and planning menus. Hustling, bustling, phone calls, flight arrangements, driving for hours, new clothes, washing old clothes, knitting, sewing, cleaning, stringing lights, talking about the in-laws, smiling when they arrive and doing the happy dance when they leave. WHOA! What a lotta fun! It’s just amazing what we do and what we have done for us in return during the holiday season.

Although everyone complains about the commercialism
of the season, seems that most people have the loving
spirit during the holidays, for what’s it all about
if not for love?

The most endearing stories come about this time of year. And ones that are told for generations. Like the one I tell about my Dad. There was a tradition at our house when I was young that the tree arrived with Santa in the night after the kids were asleep. We went to bed and the living room was just like it had been all year. When we awoke, there was the tree with decorations and presents underneath, all the more magical because we hadn’t lived around it for a month.

It wasn’t until YEARS later I found out Mother and Daddy didn’t have the money to buy a tree. My Dad would go out after we were asleep, therefore, find a Christmas tree lot that was closing and get a tree cheaply. One year the cost was fifty cents. Then, even though they were probably exhausted, they spent all night decorating it so we would be surprised in the morning.

Too much of a good thing is just right!

When I look back over the years, dolls were such a big part of Christmas morning. Big dolls, little dolls, Teddy Bears and any other humanized animal shape you could imagine that could be talked into wearing clothes.  Little girls I knew loved them and loved all the accessories that went with them. That just made Christmas.  A new doll. When I was pretty little, I remember wanting a Betsy Wetsy, oh! so badly.

I could fill her baby bottle full of water, jam it in the hole that interrupted her cherub lips to feed her. Then, predictably the water would run out into her little diapers, so I could change them and start over, just like real life. My Dad had an Aunt Ishy, her nickname as I couldn’t say “Elizabeth.” Daddy told me to take Betsy Wetsy, recently fed, to Aunt Ishy and let her hold the doll. She was the fun Aunt and the one who would naturally let out a Whoop! when Betsy’s diapers became wet. And Aunt Ishy did not disappoint. She had had three sons, so being the only girl in the family, I was welcomed, even if my doll wet on her.

Then, I wanted a Revlon doll. I was fascinated by her fingernails that had nail polish to match her lipstick. I guess matching lipstick and nail polish would figure because she was made by Revlon. New dolls were definitely something to which to aspire. The latest and greatest were the object of envy by girls trying to keep up with other little girl Joneses.

Sporting a delightful deckle edge, this photo from the
1950s shows the importance of dolls on Christmas morning.

For all of us who grew up “back then,” there will always be something special about a new doll on Christmas morning. I know I get tingles when I think of how I felt. Why, I’m even reliving it right now. Always wanting to share, I have found a way for you to have the feeling as well. I want to give you a new doll on Christmas morning. Right here, right now.

Do you know Dolly Dingle? The forerunner of the Champbell’s Soup Kids by renown artist Grace Drayton, Dolly Dingle fascinated me as a child as my mother a folder of them from her own childhood. I have remained a devoted fan to this day.

So, here is one of my favorites, under your computer “tree” and wrapped to open by clicking on the image below.

Merry Christmas to each and every person who finds
this page! I hope all of your problems are little ones.

Click on the Dolly Dingle above to download a PDF for your own personal use.

 

(And fair warning. Don’t leave her alone on your
computer screen with any Christmas cake on your
desk. Look at what I saw when I came back into
my office. Whoa! Scary!)

 

MERRY CHRISTMAS
and the best of holiday seasons!

NaBloPoMo 2011



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NaBloPoMo November 2012