Nov 09 2011

Your Family Cow in Chambersburg, PA has a cooperative
arrangement with organic beekeepers who place organic
bee hives on the ecofarm in a win-win for bees and crops.

When I received my e-mail newsletter from Your Family Cow this morning, I was very interested in their link to an article entitled, “Tests Show Most Store Honey isn’t Honey.” Whoa! What did the article mean by that? Hurrying through the link to the article, I read an extensive report about how much of commercially marketed store bought honey has had the pollen removed by diluting the honey to force it through finely pored sieves. Honey without pollen isn’t honey as defined by most of the health organizations in the world. Our own FDA says, “… any product that’s been ultra-filtered and no longer contains pollen isn’t honey.” However, the FDA isn’t checking honey sold here to see if it contains pollen and unless a jar of honey is purchased on the farm or, in some cases in a health food store, it probably is not really honey.

If your eyes are like mine and you are having trouble
ready this fine print, go to the original article in
Food Safety News to see the chart by clicking here.

The article continues, “Ultra filtering is a high-tech procedure where honey is heated, sometimes watered down and then forced at high pressure through extremely small filters to remove pollen, which is the only foolproof sign identifying the source of the honey. It is a spin-off of a technique refined by the Chinese, who have illegally dumped tons of their honey – some containing illegal antibiotics – on the U.S. market for years.” The pollen in organic honey proves that the honey is unadulterated and has not been processed.  It also allows the honey to be tracked from its location to tell whether the honey is safe or has toxic additives.

Our food supply is totally dependent on pollinating bees.

This morning’s Your Family Cow e-mail also tells of a new movie coming out, Queen of the Sun, that sounds an alert on the important relationship between bees and our food supply. If you are interested in going to the Queen of the Sun web site, click here. If you are interested in visiting the Your Family Cow web site, click here.

“Even though bees are small, unobtrusive creatures, they play large roles in the ecosystem. The connection between bees and humankind also is symbolic of a broader interconnection between humans and the natural world.”

If you have an interest in this book from Amazon,
hover your mouse over the following link:
Bee Pollination in Agricultural Ecosystems



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Filed under: Food,Veg Garden — admin @ 6:38 pm Comments (0)
Sep 20 2010

This baby rabbit munching on a dandelion is so happy to be alive and well loved. There seems to be nothing better than a dandelion flower held by a helping hand. We have rabbits in our yard and every spring we are treated to a sweet visit from little baby rabbits who like to snack on our clovers. Do you like rabbit babies?  Then you will like this post!

This baby rabbit thinks a dandelion is YUMMY!

Lots of rabbits are born every year, and sometimes, they don’t have homes. There are organizations run by people who love rabbits and take care of them until each rabbit finds a home of its own. Rabbit lovers are very enthusiastic about rabbits!

Here is a web site, House Rabbit Network, run by rabbit lovers for rabbit lovers. They have lots of fun pages with entries of rabbit facts and photos. There is even a page of photographs of mother rabbits cuddling with their babies. Go here to the mother/baby photo page, because you can click on a mother rabbit and she will tell a story.



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Filed under: Heart,Kids — admin @ 8:05 pm Comments (0)
Aug 27 2010

My marble sculpture is not at a museum,
but in our rock garden.

Everyone who decides to attend college eventually has to take a course that they wouldn’t have otherwise selected, to fulfill a requirement or an open time slot in their schedule. Colleges want graduates to be well rounded in their field of study, not just proficient in their favorite courses.

So, that’s how I became a sculptor of marble. I was a drawing and painting major working on my studio art degree at the University of Maryland in the early 1970s, and to complete my degree, I was required to take a sculpture class. I had watched a talented sorority sister, also in studio art, sculpt a clay figure with a wire armature inside to support it and that was the class I wanted to take. But, that class was full and so I had to decide whether to wait a semester or go ahead and sign up for the only other sculpture class fitting my schedule, a marble sculpting class. Well, I thought, how hard could it be?

Well, it was really hard. The physicality of marble sculpture is not to be taken lightly. On the first day of class I found myself standing on a HUGE block of marble with a jack hammer trying to hold it steady while I was shaken beyond what I had ever thought possible. Kenneth Campbell, a renown marble sculptor, was the Professor and he insisted we learn the art from start to finish. I did not expect to be hammering off large chucks of marble from the huge block I was standing on, enough for each person in the class, but I had to jump up and take my turn like everyone else.

A sculpting tool kit offered by Sculpture House.

Then I had to learn to sharpen the tools, the chisels and points on a sharpening stone with oil as a lubricant.  Next, I had to learn to hold the tools correctly and hit them with the 2 1/2 pound hammer to flick off a tiny chip of stone. Finally, I had to learn that my hands would be “ringing” with the feeling of the hammer hitting the chisel long after the sculpting session had ended. It was a long and laborious process, my marble sculpture class that semester. One that gave me the highest respect for anyone who completes a marble sculpture. Especially getting it shiny smooth by using the progressively smaller sizes of abrasive grits rubbed over and over on every surface. What I learned that year was, completing a marble sculpture takes nothing short of a miracle.

I wouldn’t know how that miracle happens because my marble sculpture was never finished to that level of perfection. Even so, my scuplture and I spent so much time together that I now display it proudly: as a petunia support and chipmunk watering hole. I feel both petunias and chipmunks should have nothing but the best.

And, every time I go to the University of Maryland and am walking by the Night – Day sculpture created by Professor Campbell and photographed below, I say, “Hi!” to him and wish him well.

Kenneth Campbell (1913 – 1986)

When I was enrolled in Mr. Campbell’s marble sculpture class in 1972, he was installing his Night – Day sculpture on the University of Maryland, College Park campus. Marble sculpture is physically so demanding. I mean these blocks are HEAVY. It is amazing how he was able to balance them so that they are in place today, just as he left them, thirty-eight years ago. (Thirty-eight years ago? I was watching him thirty-eight years ago?…sigh…)

“Night – Day” sculpture resembling Stonehenge along the path between Holzapfel and H. J. Patterson Halls at the University of Maryland, College Park; sculpted by Kenneth Campbell, art professor emeritus, who taught stone carving for fifteen years; created in 1972, the pieces represent the various stages of “enlightenment”

If you are interested in seeing this sculpture listed in D.C. Memorials or view other sculptures in natural settings in the Washington, D.C. area, click here.

“High Class in a Minute”

In this video, we can watch marble sculptress Jill Burkee use both hand tools and power tools as she breaks her sculpture free from a block of marble. While watching Ms. Burkee, you will be listening to Luciano Pavarotti, the world famous tenor opera star, singing Franck’s Panis Angelicus with some Ave Maria at the end for good measure. This is quite a dose of High Class. I hope that if it’s first thing in the morning, you’ve had your coffee.



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Filed under: Beauty,Outside — admin @ 6:31 pm Comments (0)

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