Feb 29 2012

Carrots are hearty root vegetables that are easily stored for winter.

When times are tough, or even when they’re not, where can you buy ten pounds of organic food for $6.00? COSTCO, that’s where, and probably other places as well, but COSTCO is amazing as they have a number of organic foods I wasn’t expecting at such a large “big box” store. And ten pounds of organic food is ten pounds of organic goodness that can fill lots of tummies for quite a while.

I am talking about COSTCO’s organic carrots, which are the deal of the century. You just have to like carrots and yet be aware that if you eat too many at once, you can turn orange from the carrot coloring, carotene. But, other than that, these handy root vegetables will store for quite a while as long as you take them out of their plastic bags and put them in the vegetable crisper of the refrigerator.

Slicing carrots into “Copper Pennies” begins a
side dish that will become a family treat.

COSTCO carrots, I found are even cheaper, in other areas of the country. While ten pounds of COSTCO Organic Carrots are between six and seven dollars outside of the Washington, D.C., Metropolitan area, the COSTCO web site shows that ordering on-line allows you to buy ten pounds of organic carrots for, if you can believe it, $ 4.99, plus some shipping and handling, I’m sure.

Overall, carrots are a great addition to any frugal household hoping to sustain life on grated carrot raisin salad, vegetable soup, carrot cake or carrot juice. Why, one could make a whole seven course meal using carrots every step of the way. This is not beginning to mention, however, the best use of all for carrots, making Copper Pennies.

Fill a saucepan with the sliced carrots and cover
with filtered water and some pinches of Real Salt.

When the carrots have cooked, but are still firm
enough to hold their shape and not become mush,
pour off the water.

Food fantasies were big at our house when I was a kid. My dad, more than my mother, tried to make things “kid friendly” and would come up with names for things he thought we might not want to eat. It wasn’t until years later that I learned the real reason he was watching out for us. He, himself, didn’t like the serving choices and that’s why he thought he had to make them fun for us. That’s why we had “Liver Candy” for calves liver and “Baby Cabbages” for Brussels sprouts, in addition to “Copper Pennies” for cooked carrots.

Melt some grass fed organic better in a pan with
organic brown sugar. Add carrots and stir to heat through
and coat with yummy candy-like goodness.

And I suppose I continued the fun food naming trend when my kids were small. There was nothing they liked more than a little bowl of frozen peas. We called them “Pea-sicles,” named after Popsicle brand frozen ice confections.

We Serve our Copper Pennies with sour cream,
walnuts and a sprinkle of brown sugar, all organic.

This making “much over nothing” to bring smiles to the face of a child is lots of fun for adults as well. Coincidentally, the art of entertaining children reminds me of a post I read this week on BlogHer: It will be like an Amusement Park…only Better. A fanciful, creative post by BlogHer “dvorakoelling,” relatively new to our BlogHer world, but already participating handily.

Much like my Dad and I making up little fantasies to tickle a kid, Dvora explains how she took kiddie playacting to new heights when she turned her local supermarket and shopping mall into a Disney World of sorts. I read enchantingly as Dvora described bringing the fun of a trip to FantasyLand to her seventeen month old daughter by using their cooperative imaginations to turn shopping carts into bumper cars and mall escalators into rides. It sounds like they had fun, and I know I did as well, as I read along with Dvora, thinking of my Dad’s tricks to make everyday special. What a childhood rich in love I had with my Dad and Dvora’s daughter, Em, is enjoying everyday with her Mom, today.

I got to thinking, simple games are like COSTCO carrots: both are nourishing; both cost little.

In a world of expensive clothes, plastic and trinkets, these thoughts really made me smile!

NaBloPoMo February 2012



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Jan 18 2012

Visiting “The Future” at the New York World’s Fair, 1964-1965,
while in 1960’s clothes.

When I was a kid, we looked to the future through a TV cartoon time warp called “The Jetsons.” Then, while we watched futuristic “programming” on TV, our parents were also being instructed by mass media that the future would bring better living to us all. We were told daily that the progress to take us blindly into the future would be better, much better than anything in the present. It was inferred that we should just trust whomever was bringing this to pass. And so, when the biggest international event of the decade occurred, the 1964-65 World’s Fair in New York City, we knew we were on the cusp of a wave that would carry us aloft to glorious destinies. We didn’t know where we were heading, but we knew we were getting there fast, and that it was going to be better, right?

Bell Telephone Pavillion: New York World’s Fair 1964-1965.
“Peace through Understanding” Moving chairs carry the Fairgoer
past animated exhibits tracing the history of communications.
Anyone may try out “picture phones” -phones equipped with TV
devices showing the person on the other end.

Bigger was better. Faster was better. More, stronger, cheaper was better. New and improved? Well, of course THAT was better. The words new and improved must mean something was really NEW and IMPROVED. It therefore must be better. The box said so, just as the TV had. Who could argue that the product wasn’t actually new and improved? And since the new and improved product was now and the old has-been product was then, this product in the present HAD to be better…but nothing compared to what it would be in the future!

The New York World’s Fair 1964-1965

And so, whirling in this vortex of progress, spiraling upwards, or so we thought, we became very impressionable to the idea that new was better and old served no purpose. Like modern lemmings, we followed the promises of the TV box that guided us through every day to “improve” our otherwise primitive lives. And so, our societal common sense undermined, we believed like children that modern was good and old fashioned was not only outdated, but bad. For example, I can remember visiting my mother’s family home where her cousin had “modernized” and replaced “all of those silly old, dark, heavy walnut doors and matching woodwork” hoping to bring a Federal Period house into the 20th century.

And here are people in 1965, trying their best to be
“Futuristic” with a lamp pole, sunburst wall clock and
“modern art” man-made fiber curtains.

And as fast was better, convenience overcame tried and true. I can remember my mother laughing, as she opened a loaf of spongy white Wonderbread, that Mrs. So-and-so made bread for her family every week. Nobody we knew had ever made bread. And then we went through all of elementary school, junior and senior high school with the same group of kids year, in and year out. We knew everything about everybody. Trust me, no one baked bread, no one, except Mrs. So-and-so. Buying convenience foods, opening cans, heating up frozen food, using cake mixes: no one we knew had mothers that did anything much more than that. On occasion, cookies might be made from scratch, but NEVER a cake.

Convenience and taste, not nutrition, were the selling points.
H-m-m-m. Wonder what chemicals were used to replicate the eggs?

According to the Joy of Baking:  “Eggs play a major role in cake
baking. Eggs add aeration to the batter, provide structure to
the cake, help bind the ingredients together, keep the cake moist
and add flavor and tenderness.”

Eggs sound important to a cake! What did they use instead?

The modern housewife was told by mass media advertising that convenience was the way of the future and the less done the better. It was the futuristic way to do things for those in the know. The whole concept of eating to nurture the body while promoting wellness was not considered. Nutritional content was not considered. The only things that seemed important were taste and convenience. And if that taste were stimulated by a chemical cocktail, no one seemed to mind or notice.

This hash commercial is odd for a number of reasons. You’ll see
that as long as women were invisible and could open a can of
hash, things were fine.

But, how did the woman and the hash feel about it?
And how nutritious was that dinner of canned hash and eggs?

Little by little, convenience foods became fast foods. It wasn’t that long before men, women and families began eating out more and more. In addition, as people ate out more often, cost became a concern and restaurants offering good “home cooking” were expensive compared to McDonald’s “four course meal with change from a dollar.” We were detached from the concept that what we ate physically became our bodies and minds. In fact, I can’t remember chemical additives or preservatives ever being commonly discussed. Maybe there was mention of nitrates and nitrites in hot dogs once in a while, but overall we ate without self awareness.

Now I understand that nutrient dense food is not only medicine, but provides the foundations for living. That’s why “The Jetson’s” putting a pill in a wall unit that looks prognostic of microwave ovens, closing the door and pushing a button to conveniently produce a plate full of food seems out of date. The concept is old fashioned, from when that was considered “modern” and is comically passe. People now know wholesome, unadulterated slow foodstuffs are truly the building blocks of life. Therefore, any quaint desire for convenience, at the expense of nutrition and wellness, has thankfully gone the way of the TV dinner.

 

Where do great meals begin?

Come to the Table brings you straight to the source of wonderful flavors, beauty, abundance, and pride of place—the small farms of California and the people who tend them season after season.
Alice Waters, the celebrated chef and food activist, introduces a remarkable group of resilient fresh-food artisans who are committed to keeping our food supply delicious, diverse, and safe—for humans and the planet. Meet the folks down on the farm and learn firsthand about the back-to-the-future small-farm economy that’s gaining strength across America. Discover new tastes and memorable traditions. Explore local flavors, wit, and wisdom along with the universal values of a food system that is “good, clean, and fair.” Recreate a range of sumptuous yet simple meals with the farmers’ own family recipes—including breakfast crostata and fresh-fruit jams, stuffed artichokes and black-eyed peas, chile relleno casseroles, pulled pork, and cheesecake.Sustainable food is real food.
Come to the table, and help yourself!
 

If you have an interest in this book, hover your mouse over:

Slow Food Nation’s Come to the Table: The Slow Food Way of Living

NaBloPoMo January 2012



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Jan 02 2012

The older I get, the better I understand Ben Franklin
saying “a penny saved is a penny earned.”

Whenever I feel a need to jump start my financial situation, I turn to self-help authors, although I have been “self-helping” myself so long, I should probably have written self-help books by now. Even so, I like to bring in new ideas and feel bolstered in my efforts at improvement by listening to voices of authority. I never get tired of “going to school.” I suppose that does make me a perpetual student, but I’m not offended by that term.

At any rate, after watching all sorts of experts from all sorts of places, it seems the best advice to be found is to spend less than you make, or make more than you spend. In addition, it seems the only sure fire way to make money is to save it, by setting aside some of whatever it is I can bring in. I’ve decided even if I’m just saving  spare change in a sugar bowl, the old time symbol of frugal housewifery, I will be better off tomorrow, thanks to my efforts today.

Sugar bowls, all shapes and sizes, have traditionally been
a safe haven for women’s household emergency money.

I like the female energy of saving in a sugar bowl. I like female traditions handed down since kitchens have had cupboards. Connecting to a long line of women who have known how to control that which they could control, makes me feel more solid. And sugar bowls are so profoundly beautiful, whimsical, floral, Scandinavian, elegant and retro that there is something for everyone, no matter what the inner saver may require to get motivated.

The sugar bowl is a secret place hidden away in what, for most of history, has been a women’s refuge, the kitchen. There is no reason why, as we grab a briefcase to go out to the morning commute, this tender tradition can’t continue. Handy change for needy moments, right there, ready to go and only we know where it is, or that it even exists.

Anne is author of the blog, Sugar Bowl Mix

Speaking of sugar bowls, I joined www.BlogHer.com in November 2011, and have been enjoying the contact with female bloggers. On BlogHer, there is a particular blogger who carries on the female tradition of the sugar bowl. A blog called Sugar Bowl Mix posted by Anne, was one of the blogs that got me interested in BlogHer in the first place. Anne understands the tradition of the sugar bowl and has a great anecdote about a family sugar bowl that she shares here.

Anne’s lovely heirloom sugar bowl has a cute story.

But! Anne hasn’t blogged since October, 2011, and I miss her! Maybe she is tired of the demands of blogging, after all, she’s been at it since 2009. Or, maybe she needs to hear from her reading public that we miss her. Whatever the reason, I want to start an e-mail shower for Anne at Sugar Bowl Mix right here, right now.

Would you help?

You can write Anne and tell her she’s missed by
sending an e-mail to: Anne(at)sugarbowlmix(dot)com

 

To visit Anne’s blog, click this button:

Be sure and write and let Anne know we want
  more stories from and about the sugar bowl.

 

If you need more money to put in your sugar bowl, this
series of positive thinking lectures by Napoleon Hill
is captivating. See what you think.

 

NaBloPoMo January 2012



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Dec 28 2011

After a hard day of yard work, it’s time to put another
meal on the table.  No biggie!  All you have to do
is fry some ready made Corn Meal Mush!

Corn Meal Mush is a long forgotten staple for those of limited means. I didn’t have the opportunity to forget it as I had never heard of it until I became friends with the Amish. Served at least once a week, it can be found at breakfast, lunch and/or dinner in an Amish home. Corn Meal Mush is their rice or pasta. I sure wish I had known about the option when I was in college, along with slow cooking nutrient dense food. Rather than existing on chicken noodle soup and Cheerios, I could have had nutritious, inexpensive, easy to prepare meals waiting for me in my refrigerator every day of the week. But, I have made up for lost time. I tell everyone I know about the delights and practicality of Corn Meal Mush and its logical endpoint, Fried Corn Meal Mush.

Organic Polenta Corn Grits make the best Corn Meal Mush.

When I first learned about this “new” and amazing food stuff in the 1980s, we used the corn meal made by Quaker Oats, packed in a smaller cardboard round box, much like the Quaker Oats oatmeal. But, now with the Organic Polenta Corn Grits available, my Corn Meal Mush has extra vibrancy and go power. The coarser grit of the Polenta delivers lots of flavor.

Place 9 cups of filtered water and 3 1/2  cups of Organic Corn meal in a saucepan. Add salt to taste. I add 1 1/2 teaspoons of Real Salt.  Now, here is the trick: you MUST stir it the whole time over medium to medium/high heat. Do not answer the phone. Don’t try to put a dish in the dish washer, just STIR YOUR MUSH. That’s the only hard part. Multitasking is not allowed, if it involves hands.

Eventually the corn will expand and become one with the water. DON’T STOP STIRRING until you take it off the stove. It should be like hot cereal and very homogeneous as it starts to bubble.

At this point, you can call it a day and just have hot cereal. Add butter and maple syrup for the pancake route or cheese and tomato sauce for the traditional Southwestern Polenta route. The good news is if you keep going to make the Fried Corn Meal Mush, you will probably have enough left over for a bowl of hot cereal to reward you for your trouble as well.

So, pour the hot cereal Corn Meal Mush into containers. Loaf pans or refrigerator dishes work well and they DON’T need to be greased.  I usually get three loaf pans or one loaf type pan and one large refrigerator dish. Notice I am showing the saucepan full of soapy water, because once you pour the cereal and scrape the pan, the saucepan needs to be filled with water. If you forget, the cereal bits will turn to concrete and be hard to remove.

Now, let the Mush cool to room temperature, then put it in the refrigerator until it congeals. When solid, slice, dredge all sides in flour and fry in organic coconut oil

Here are the Mush slices when they start and…

…here they are when getting golden.

Dinner’s ready! Yum-Yum and Cheap-Cheap!

The evening we made this for dinner, we had organic coleslaw, bacon and organic scrambled eggs cooked in organic bacon grease. Those of you not familiar with the Weston A. Price philosophy will be shocked at eating eggs cooked in bacon fat like people used to do before the misinformation about low-fat diets became popular.

The truth is, high cholesterol has never been scientifically proven to cause heart disease. In fact, this country’s heart disease skyrocketed when low-fat diets became popular. So did many neurological and neuromuscular problems. Most people do not have enough fat in their diets and they are suffering for it.

Here is a very important PDF about the myths of cholesterol that have been foisted upon the public for many years. And, BTW, those of you suffering from depression may be fat starved. This is serious stuff! You must have good organic fats in your diet to survive and thrive.  There are many articles and endless references on the Weston A. Price web site. Be sure to research this information. When you hear it for the first time, it is difficult to believe.

NaBloPoMo 2011



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Nov 29 2010

Sixty tea bags nicely organized in a Round Tea Bag Box
with sparkly ribbons and chocolate coins on top!

Have you discovered Walter Drake? What a GREAT catalog company. I have ordered bunches of “can’t live without” gadgets, organizers and gifts and have been pleased with everything I have ordered. Not only do the orders arrive very promptly, but on the rare occasion that there is a mistake, a correction is offered without hesitation. I don’t know how I found about Walter Drake, but I guess online as they have a very efficient catalog web site located here.

Once I was in the Walter Drake system, I started receiving wonderful paper catalogs and e-mails giving me special offers that are so good, they are hard to refuse. The selection, sales, reasonable regular prices and occasional offers of free shipping are really hard to pass up.

When I needed to make twenty hostess gifts this Thanksgiving, (Yes! Twenty!) I turned to Walter Drake to see what I could find to make a financially reasonable presentation. If you go to the web site and search for ROUND TEA BAG BOX or click here, you will see what I decided to purchase. What a bargain!

Regularly price at $7.99, each Round Tea Bag Box was on sale for $2.92 and I was able to take advantage of free shipping. Woo-Woo! So, I bought two widths of wire edge ribbon at Costco, one 1 1/2 ” gold sparkle and 2 1/2″ white with silver sparkle snowflakes. Each roll was tremendous at 50 yards, not feet, but YARDS for $6.50. I only needed one of each. Next, I bought little white gift bags at Michaels with a 40% off coupon making a package of 50 cost $11.99 instead of $19.99.  Then I bought a bag of gold foil chocolate coins, once again from COSTCO at $13.95 for a bag of a zillion and I was set, except for the tea.

I am having a love affair with Walter Drake. With my large
Round Tea Bag Box order, I even got a personal letter of
thanks for being a good customer. I don’t know whether to
be happy or embarrassed about buying so much…

Next I had to figure out the tea bags as I wanted to fill the Round Tea Bag Boxes. I went to two different grocery stores and between the two of them I was able to buy twelve different flavors on sale, five boxes of each at $2.50 a box.  I bought the kind that are wrapped in foil wrappers so they last longer if people don’t get to them right away. BUT! Be aware, that if you are going to use the large foil packs in your Round Tea Bag Boxes, the box will be a little short. In other words, the lid will not sit snugly on the top of the box and there will be a little space between the two.  Didn’t bother me as I decided to use the gold ribbon around the circumference of the box, with the white ribbon around the bottom and tied with a bow on top. These two ribbons held everything together nicely.

There are six sections to the Round Tea Bag Box. I chose
12 teas with 5 teabags of 2 flavors in each section.

I cut 4’2″ of the 1 1/2″ wide gold sparkle ribbon
and tied it around the box.

I cut 4’9″ of the 2 1/2″ wide white with silver sparkle
snowflakes ribbon, wrapped it bottom to top and tied a
big bow on top. Next, I cut a 4″ x 6″ index card into
thirds, cut the points off of two corners, wrote the
recipient’s name and tied it to the bow with a little bit
of white thread.

 Then I filled the white gifts bags with coins and used the gift
bag’s ribbon to tie them around the big white bow.

I had to make twenty of these, but if you just need to make one, think of how inexpensive it could be using things you probably have at home, especially if you love fabric. Cutting strips of fabric with your rotary cutter and tying it as I did the ribbon would make the gift nice and homey. But, even if you have to buy ribbon, this gift when finished was under $15.00. They were more like $13.50 each. I was happy. Now, I am just hoping all of my recipients are tea drinkers!

If you enjoy making gifts and want some good ideas, then
preview this book by hovering your mouse over this link:

A Gift of Herbs to Make Easy, Inexpensive & Thoughtful Gifts Using Herbs



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Nov 28 2010

I was happy to find this video on YouTube.com, not only because it give instructions on turning outdated garments into useful fashion, but also because it is one of a slew of YouTube sewing videos uploaded by teenagers who seem to have an avid interest in sewing and taking care of their needs.

So much fun to think our younger generations are learning to sew and create with fabric. See what you think! You just might end up making a “Scoodie” yourself!

Make a scarf with a hoodie…a SCOODIE!

For other Scoodie styles and directions, try clicking here, or here or here. Try making one and you’ll have lots of fun, gain something handy, be warm and enjoy the satisfaction of making something yourself!

Or, buy a readymade Scoodie provided by a talented artisan on “etsy” by clicking here.

To preview a more sophistcated Scoodie look,
hover your mouse over the link below:

Janska Hooded Scarf, Black, OS



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Oct 17 2010

Soup kitchens were and are well attended. Here the Navy
staffs a recent soup kitchen in Salinas, California

The Great Depression and what is happening today financially seem very similar. No matter how these times are labeled compared to the Great Depression, there was hardship then and I know there is a great deal of hardship now.  That’s from practical experience, from reading books and searching the Internet and I’ve learned it must take a great deal of research to sort it all out.

I never feel like I’ve gotten to the heart of the matter with all of my questions answered.  So, as there is safety in numbers, I’ve decided to take you with me to see what you think about it all and share some information, hoping that you’ll respond about what’s happening to you where you are in the country, or the world.

First, here is an interesting comparison page on CNN, that you can access by clicking here.

Then I found an article, also on CNN, that says this is definitely a recession and not another depression and explains the ramifications of each, and you can find that here.

This video finds more similarities than not between the Depression and whatever is happening today, however you want to label it. To me the video was helpful in adding another point of view. Love the song, by the way…

Housing Bubble vs. Great Depression

Then, to top it off, here is an article on saying that the only difference between a depression and a recession is the length of time…whoa! After all we’ve learned in other places, that’s heavy. You can see in the article that “a depression is a protracted recession.” Here, you can read it yourself,  or read this except to get the gist of the discussion:

Recession versus Depression:

“It’s pretty easy to understand depressions once you get the concept of recessions. A depression is simply a prolonged or particularly excruciating recession. Economists don’t really have a watermark to indicate a depression. Believe it or not, there’s even an economists’ joke that describes the ambiguity between recessions and depressions: A recession is when your neighbor loses his job; a depression is when you lose your job [If you need a more technical explanation, click here.] While the presence of a recession is debatable, when a depression hits, the issue is no longer up for debate.”

H-m-m-m. Sorta’ seems like when you’re a kid and ask grown-ups, “How will I know when I fall in love?”

They always answer, “Oh…YOU’LL know.”



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Filed under: Bankruptcy,Money — admin @ 8:40 pm Comments (0)
Oct 11 2010

With the growing demand for organic food, most anything
found as conventional food also can be found as organic.

In 2008, when we were introduced to the concept of drinking real milk, we also learned it is now possible to eat completely organically. Our friends already living that lifestyle set a good example and by following their lead, we learn to spiral upward as well.

At first, because we knew organic foods costs more than their conventional counterparts, we thought it would break our budget.  We soon realized that because we were receiving better, more complete nutrients, we were satisfied more quickly and did not eat as much. In fact, it was amazing the savings once we started eating wholly organic. And, we found that many of our health complaints lessened. We began to notice we did not catch colds or get sick like we used to. So, that was a definite savings in time and money as well.

The big financial savings came when we decided not to eat at restaurants anymore. The money saved was incredible. We ate better and had more time than we thought possible to cook and prep meals once we weren’t tied down to a restaurant wait for seating and service. Now, we are really repulsed by the thought of eating out. We do “go along for the ride” with friends and business associates, but we eat before we go and have Perrier sparkling water at the table.

I have many thoughts to share about the health benefits of not only eating organically, but also, NOT eating refined foods and foods with chemical additives. There is much information to learn, maybe, for you to make the switch, but if you just start as we did, a little at a time, you’ll be ready to opt for good health and never look back.

Whole Foods Market offers a quick introduction to the basics of organic farming in this video from their web site. Learn some of the principles of organic agriculture, as well as hear from several farmers who choose to farm organically.

Whole Foods Market, IP, L.P. is our nation’s first organic grocer.

Are you already eating with us as organic consumers? If so, can you share how it has helped you redefine your health priorities? If not, have you thought of going organic?



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Oct 01 2010

A 10 cent Savings Stamp, available for purchase until 1970.

When I was a kid we saved in school. Each week, the teacher gave students an opportunity to buy Savings Stamps. Some of you will remember Savings Stamps, and if you do, you know they had engravings of the Minuteman statue, they were licked and then they were collectively placed in paper folders to await redemption.

When the paper folders were full of stamps equaling whatever the proper purchase value was, they were traded in for a $25 United States Savings Bond. The Bond wasn’t worth $25 when you bought it, but with time would accrue interest until it could be cashed in for twenty-five dollars.

This book on war savings bonds might be of interest. Preview this Kindle Book by hovering your mouse over this link:

Factual information, the seven war loans and the victory loan, war savings bonds and stamps



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Sep 30 2010

When I was a kid, we saved “Lady Head” Dimes.

By the time I was a kid in the 1950s, there was a mixture of “Mercury Dimes,” or lady head dimes as we called them, and Roosevelt Dimes in circulation. I had a girlfriend, a BFF or Best Friend Forever, by today’s vernacular, who belonged to a very functional family that seemed to have every based covered. They were also very frugal and spent their money wisely from everything I could see and from what I can now remember. The concept of saving lady head dimes” was not my own, therefore, but came from my girlfriend, Janet.

A Roosevelt Dime

I remember one day when I was at her home with her and her family, one of them was handling a handful of change for some reason and exclaimed, “Oh! A lady head dime!” The treasure was immediately removed from the handful of change and placed in a savings bank. It was explained to me, that lady head dimes were being saved. Saved? That was a new concept: to save regularly from pocket change. But, saving that way was a formal experience and I enjoyed the immediacy of Janet’s lady head dime method deducted from “cash on hand.”

I thought collecting lady head dimes was a great idea and started saving them on my own in a little round glass fishbowl Daddy had helped me win at a carnival by throwing a ping pong ball at a display of goldfish meekly awaiting their fates. After the fish had decided to move on to better things, the fishbowl sat on my Mother’s old vanity table in my room at home.

The bowl just sat there and the dimes within it grew and grew until one day I had the fishbowl almost full and spent it for some goody at the dime-store, which you have to admit, was appropriate. I have always remembered the thrill of the experience, for it made the idea of saving money for a rainy day into a game of treasure hunt. And the Liberty Dimes were declining in the frequency with which they were found in pocket change, so I did not generally miss the amount subtracted from my cash flow.

I still save that way today saving selected state quarters. It’s a handy way to save and it is amazing how these little subtractions from pocket change add up to provide a nest egg. Why not try selecting a coin for saving out of your pocket change? Then you’ll have a cache of coins for when you need that little extra something.

Why you could even save them in a sugar bowl in the kitchen cabinet, just like they did in all of the farmhouses on TV. If you watched those shows, you’ll remember the mother would think pensively about some otherwise denied purchase, go to the kitchen cabinet, solemnly take out the sugar-bowl and say wistfully, “Well, I guess we’ll just have to take the money out of the sugar-bowl.” Her voice then trailed off into a fear for the future.

Start your Sugar Bowl nestegg today! It’s fun and it accrues quickly.



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