Oct 01 2011

Visiting Your Family Cow connects us with the Shank family.
They work hard to provide our family with pure nutrient food.

One of our favorite stops on our trips to Pennsylvania is Your Family Cow Eco-farm owned and operated by Edwin and Dawn Shank and their energetic family. We love the high fat milk from their Jersey cows, the nicely stocked farm store and the attractive milking barn and home. The Shanks are generational farmers and their farm know how shows everywhere you look. The clean, welcoming barn and the nicely tended cows and calves attest to the love with which the Shanks mind their herd.

The Your Family Cow farm store is inviting and offers a wide
selection of organic foods. We enjoy grass fed beef, free
range chickens and their eggs in addition to ham and sausage.

When we drive up early in the morning, we know our breakfast will be soon be selected straight from Your Family Cow milk, cheese and bakery coolers. Often, we buy a gallon of “raw” or real milk, as I prefer to say, and some of Dawn’s fresh made baked goods, usually including her world famous pumpkin chocolate chip muffins. There are always many tempting products for sale, all local to the area if not directly harvested from the Shank’s own acreage.

Dawn Shank, her fresh baked pies and baked goods
are well known to our family and friends.

This last visit, we were delighted to find fresh peach pies in the cheese cooler on the baked goods shelf. The pies vary in size as some are very small 3-4 inches, maybe, and the others are full size pies. We buy the smaller ones to eat on the road with everyone getting their own mini-pie…they are SO CUTE! And, then we buy full size pies to give out to friends and neighbors at home.

Your Family Cow grass fed beef sticks in Hot, Sweet or
Pepper flavors are a welcomed, tasty substitute for the
unhealthy chemical additives found in other beef snacks.

The treats are varied in selection, but consistently high in quality. The Shanks are devoted proponents of the Weston A. Price Foundation way of life, so the food offered for sale is nutrient dense and organic, both in content and preparation. If you also enjoy an organic lifestyle, you’ll know it’s true organic food is slightly more expensive, but that you eat less of it, because there are more nutrients in each bite. Considering living with increased health, fewer medical bills and heightened productivity, organic food is a bargain.

Real Milk is allowed to be sold in Pennsylvania stores. Grass
pastured cows and clean milking conditions produce clean,
nutritious “LIVE” milk unlike factory farms with cramped,
dirty cows whose dirty milk needs to be pasteurized.

The stars of Your Family Cow show, however, are the beautiful Jersey cows themselves, mothers of the milk produced by Your Family Cow. Jersey cows are known for their milk having a high cream content. They have the loveliest coats…or is that hides?…and their charming faces are endearing. Their large dark eyes have long eyelashes, so long , they look like the lashes on animals in the cartoons.  Whenever we visit, the cows make good use of their eyelashes, batting them up and down as they watch us from the fields and milking barn.

“Clover, don’t you think more people would drink the
milk their great grandparents grew up on if they
read about how nutritious it is?”

“Yes, Violet, I do.  They should read Nourishing Traditions
  by Sally Fallon of the Weston A. Price Foundation.
It’s a book we sell right here at Your Family Cow!”

When it comes to feeding your mind and body, what you see is what you get. At Your Family Cow in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, there’s plenty to see and even more to take home and enjoy!

 

This well-researched, thought-provoking guide to traditional foods contains a startling message: Animal fats and cholesterol are not villains but vital factors in the diet, necessary for normal growth, proper function of the brain and nervous system, protection from disease and optimum energy levels. Sally Fallon dispels the myths of the current low-fat fad in this practical, entertaining guide to a can-do diet that is both nutritious and delicious.

 

Nourishing Traditions will tell you:

1.Why your body needs old fashioned animal fats
2. Why butter is a health food
3. How high-cholesterol diets promote good health
4. How saturated fats protect the heart
5. How rich sauces help you digest and assimilate your food
6. Why grains and legumes need special preparation to provide optimum benefits
7. About enzyme-enhanced food and beverages that can provide increased energy and vitality
8. Why high-fiber, lowfat diets can cause vitamin and mineral deficiencies

Topics include the health benefits of traditional fats and oils (including butter and coconut oil); dangers of vegetarianism; problems with modern soy foods; health benefits of sauces and gravies; proper preparation of whole grain products; pros and cons of milk consumption; easy-to-prepare enzyme enriched condiments and beverages; and appropriate diets for babies and children.

To preview Nourishing Traditions, hover your mouse over this link:

 

Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrats



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Sep 17 2011

Amish and Mennonite farms present their
fall finery in tempting displays.

It’s always a shock when I wake up and realize summer’s over. It hit me today when I saw the first changing leaves. Tips of color on an otherwise summer-green tree. Sigh. It is so hard to say goodbye. I use to wait to say goodbye until I finally had to quit wearing flip-flops, but now I don’t wear flip-flops in summer and so, the move to autumn is less defined. Now I have to count on the trees to show me that time is passing. And, in that case, there is no denying the transition. It’s not subjective or based on personal preference anymore. I can’t push the envelope. When tree leaves are turning red and orange, the time to move into fall has come.

The very first bits of fall color are noticeable

on Saturday, September 17, 2011

Our drive to Pennsylvania was trying therefore, at  least it was after I noticed the tree with the color. But, putting that to the back of my mind, I had a really great time otherwise. We go to Pennsylvania to save money on food and get the best value for our money.  We buy directly from farmers to get the best food at the lowest price and it is a pleasure that enhances this time of year when winter is coming and the air is just starting to get chilled.

A fall palette of chrysanthemums waits for adoptive gardens.

After we were introduced to the teachings of Weston A. Price in 2007, we started driving to Pennsylvania to get milk, dairy products and organically grown fruits and vegetables off the farms. All of the products were so much better than we could buy at the store and we established personal relationships with the farm families. We quickly learned eating from growers we knew was comforting, because we knew exactly how our food was grown.

It always amazes me how people will fuss about having just the right designer label on their clothing, but stop for fast food to save money. Isn’t what we put into our bodies much more important than what we put on them? Food can build your body up or tear your body down. Learn to choose good, nutrient dense food for you and your family. You’ll find that, in addition to being nutritive, organic food is like medicine. It can restore and heal.

“Larksong” is the name of the organic dairy farm

in Ohio’s Holmes County owned and worked by David

and Elsie Kline with members of their family.

If you have an interest in the organic way of life, consider reviewing this lovely book illustrating the richness of living and eating organically by hovering over the link below:

Letters from Larksong: An Amish Naturalist Explores His Organic Farm

One reader review on Amazon comments:

“One key to sustainable farming, Kline says, is to “romance our children into farming,” and the key to that is to make it both profitable and fun. The Klines have managed that balancing act for generations. It requires deep knowledge of the land. So, for example, they plan their haying to allow bobolinks and vesper sparrows time to build nests, lay eggs, and raise families in the field. “Our goal is to see flying young bobolinks while we’re mowing the field,” Kline reports. They’ve seen as many as 45 singing bobolink males in twelve-acres.”

This is a beautiful book.



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